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King's Daughters / WSCS

This photo of the Pauline Methodist King’s Daughters dates to 1899-1901, when Rev. A.G. Blackwell was serving the church. Back row, left to right are Mrs. M.J. Fouts, Mrs. Clara Klingman, Mrs. George Clutes, Mrs. Florence Sutter, Mrs. Ben Sherman, Mrs. Will Sherman, Mrs. Louie Herman, Mrs. T.W. Jones, Mrs. Henry Olmstead. Third row: Mrs. Sam Bossard, Mrs. Jim White, Mrs. Frank Bourne, Mrs. T.T. Jones, Mrs. Owen Jones, Mrs. Ray Woods(1st), Mrs. John (Anna) Evans, Mrs. George Gates. Second row: Mrs. James Dean, Mrs. Hannah Franklin, Mrs. Connelly Klingman, Mrs. A.G. Blackwell (Minister’s wife), Mrs. John Overy, Mrs. Ellen Sherman, Mrs. Gilsmore (housekeeper for Morans) Front row: Mrs. Harris, Mrs. Tommy Davis, Mrs. French, Mrs. John Clutes, Mrs. William Bossard., Mrs. Jennie (Jones) Slater Comstock. The woman in the cut-out photo inset (in front of Mrs. French) is unidentified. Photo is from the Sarah Goding Post collection, courtesy of Kathy Post Seeman.This photo of the Pauline Methodist King’s Daughters dates to 1899-1901, when Rev. A.G. Blackwell was serving the church. Back row, left to right are Mrs. M.J. Fouts, Mrs. Clara Klingman, Mrs. George Clutes, Mrs. Florence Sutter, Mrs. Ben Sherman, Mrs. Will Sherman, Mrs. Louie Herman, Mrs. T.W. Jones, Mrs. Henry Olmstead. Third row: Mrs. Sam Bossard, Mrs. Jim White, Mrs. Frank Bourne, Mrs. T.T. Jones, Mrs. Owen Jones, Mrs. Ray Woods(1st), Mrs. John (Anna) Evans, Mrs. George Gates. Second row: Mrs. James Dean, Mrs. Hannah Franklin, Mrs. Connelly Klingman, Mrs. A.G. Blackwell (Minister’s wife), Mrs. John Overy, Mrs. Ellen Sherman, Mrs. Gilsmore (housekeeper for Morans) Front row: Mrs. Harris, Mrs. Tommy Davis, Mrs. French, Mrs. John Clutes, Mrs. William Bossard., Mrs. Jennie (Jones) Slater Comstock. The woman in the cut-out photo inset (in front of Mrs. French) is unidentified. Photo is from the Sarah Goding Post collection, courtesy of Kathy Post Seeman.

King's Daughters Active In Church Life*

Organized on June 30, 1892, the King’s Daughters were first part of a national organization, but soon became affiliated with the Pauline Methodist Episcopal Church. The group was active in both church and community. The first meeting took place at the home of Mrs. Ella Olmstead, southwest of town. The group was to be known as “The Friendly Circle,” with the motto “Bear Ye, One Anothers’ Burdens”. Meetings were to be opened with singing, Bible reading and prayer. According to minutes of the first meeting, “Our object, that we may become more friendly and sociable and help each other in any way we can, also to do any good we can. No special work decided on, only to increase our members and give some old linen to an invalid member.” Presumably, the linens would be made into rag rugs, becoming a means for the recipient to generate an income. By the end of the year, membership had grown to 50, with meetings taking place every two weeks in members’ homes. The group reorganized as the Woman’s Society of Christian Service on Sept. 27, 1940, continuing to meet twice a month. Later becoming part of United Methodist Women, the women discontinued meeting in the 1980s as members died, moved away or were working outside the home. However, the church women have continued to serve the community in time of need or special church celebrations.

*The brief history of this group is taken from “Pauline and Community, 1887-1987, ‘A Trail in Time’ ”.

 

A record book dating to 1901.A record book dating to 1901.

From the Record Books of King’s Daughters*

A study of church records shows that the group was active in nearly every aspect of church life, particularly with fundraising for routine operations, such as janitorial and pastoral salaries, and paying of coal and light bills. The group held regular entertainments, where Sunday school children might sing or play the piano. A gifted elocutionist, Mrs. Ella Sherman gave dramatic readings, drawing in young audiences with her gift for portraying several different characters in one reading. The women also held church and community dinners, bazaars, mission projects and regularly served lunch at area farm sales. The following facts were culled from the group’s records; they help tell the story of the times, the community and church:

Highlights From The Early 1900s

The sewing and selling of carpet rags seemed a primary pursuit for the women. The March 14 meeting minutes stated, "The P.M. was devoted to sewing carpet rags for Mrs. Herman. Mrs. Overy paid society for the carpet rags they had sewed for her." The record noted that 16 pounds of carpet rags were sewn and sold for five cents a pound.

An undated, unidentified photo of the Pauline Methodist church women. Photo is from the Sarah Goding Post collection, courtesy of Kathy Post Seeman.An undated, unidentified photo of the Pauline Methodist church women. Photo is from the Sarah Goding Post collection, courtesy of Kathy Post Seeman.

 The cost of a spool of thread was five cents. Thus, eighty-five cents was taken in. Meeting minutes noted that the group was to meet again "in two weeks at church and take dinner and sew carpet rags all day." Two weeks later it was decided "that The King's Daughters give a basket supper to raise their quarterly subscription of the minister's salary."

While one might be tempted to think of this group as inhabiting a vacuum, the record tells of a broader perspective, as at the May 2, 1901 meeting, "The Pres read a letter she rec'd from Galveston telling where the last bbl of clothing was sent which the K.D. sent to the sufferers. Motion made, seconded & carried that the K.D. send $1. to the leper in San Francisco in the name of the K.D." At this meeting the society also "decided they would give 10-cent teas every two weeks in order to enlarge the finance . . ." In another two weeks the King's Daughters paid $3.84, "our quarterly apportionment for the support of our India orphan."

This undated photo of Pauline Methodist women dates to the early part of the last century. Photo is from the Sarah Goding Post collection, courtesy of Kathy Post Seeman.This undated photo of Pauline Methodist women dates to the early part of the last century. Photo is from the Sarah Goding Post collection, courtesy of Kathy Post Seeman.

In addition to missions, community support was important as well, as the group voted "that we donate $5 towards the sidewalks in Pauline." The record also makes mention of a camp meeting in August.  

The August 8, 1901 meeting featured refreshments of ice cream, cake and lemonade. Gentility was the order of the day, as it was noted in the King's Daughter's minutes, that "Mr. Moran, Mr. T.T. Jones and Ray Moran  honored the society with their presence by coming down and buying each a dish of ice cream. . . . Adjourned after having a fine time," wrote Miss Julia French, the society's secretary.    

Highlights From The 1920s

Balance on hand Sept. 16, 1926 was sixty-seven cents. Receipts taken in during October included $3.55, $9.21, and $6.00 for lunch and dues; $59.06 from an entertainment and $41.75 from an election dinner, both held on Oct. 30. The group contributed $50.00 toward Rev. C.B. Piersol’s salary. Later that same year the King’s Daughters received $5.00 from a school donation and $71.67 from a Dec. 9 fair. One dollar and fifty cents was paid for Christmas decorations, and $6.79 was paid to the janitor.

This King’s Daughters photo dates to about 1920. From left are Clara Throne, Mrs. Jennie (Lewellyn) Bauder (Lewis), Mrs. Mary Jennie (Jones) Laird (Everett), unidentified, Mrs. Beeman, unidentified, Mrs. Nellie (Jones) Franklin (Isaac), Mrs. Lee Quig, Mrs. T.T. Jones, Mrs. Ross Fisk (in black), Mrs. Edna Brown (E.G.), Mrs. Grace (Frank) Throne, Mrs. Lizzie (Bostock) Brenaman (John). Photo is from the Sarah Goding Post collection, courtesy of Kathy Post Seeman. This King’s Daughters photo dates to about 1920. From left are Clara Throne, Mrs. Jennie (Lewellyn) Bauder (Lewis), Mrs. Mary Jennie (Jones) Laird (Everett), unidentified, Mrs. Beeman, unidentified, Mrs. Nellie (Jones) Franklin (Isaac), Mrs. Lee Quig, Mrs. T.T. Jones, Mrs. Ross Fisk (in black), Mrs. Edna Brown (E.G.), Mrs. Grace (Frank) Throne, Mrs. Lizzie (Bostock) Brenaman (John). Photo is from the Sarah Goding Post collection, courtesy of Kathy Post Seeman. Beginning January of 1927 the group contributed monies toward carpet cleaning, “drapery for church”, janitor’s salary, coal and light bills. The light bill contribution was $2.00, and the coal bill contribution was $13.24. Some of the more substantial fundraisers for the group included “Crabtree’s sale,” $31.15 (This likely involved serving lunch at a farm sale.), an apron sale, $24.15; ice cream supper, $28.42; and a program, $14.37.

In 1928 the group paid sixty cents to local resident J.G. Parker for fixing parsonage windows. On Sept. 1, $13.00 was paid for “finished coal bill” at Jones’ store, leaving the King’s Daughters with a balance of $1.76. In October the group paid $15.00 to the bank for the Epworth League piano. Receipts from a Dec. 20 bazaar and dinner totaled $35.55.

"The operetta, 'Goldilock's Adventure' which was given recently by the pupils of the Primary room of the Pauline school, under the direction of their teacher, Mrs. Walter Reiber, will be repeated Thursday evening, May 28, under the auspices of the King's Daughters in the Methodist church. Lunch will be served."

-'Pauline Items' by Mrs. Harvey Jones, "The Hastings Democrat", Thursday, May 28, 1931

Highlights From The 1930s

In 1930 records show the group served a convention dinner, purchasing from Jones’ store $9.17 worth of “material for stairway for convention dinner.” In April, a Mrs. McKenzie was paid $14.00 for “board for evangelist.”

On April 2, 1931 a motion was made to pay local store owner T.W. Jones $3.00 for papering two rooms at the parsonage. Closing song for this meeting was “Near The Cross”.  

On April 16, 1931, the community was likely experiencing the effects of the Great Depression, as the women “discussed paying dues to raise money. Motion made and seconded to bring a hen next meeting or turn in enough money in the place of one.” The motion carried, and the AprilThis stained-glass window was purchased for the church by the King's Daughters in the early 1900s.This stained-glass window was purchased for the church by the King's Daughters in the early 1900s. 16 meeting closed with the song, “The Rock That Is Higher than I”.

Fifty-five women made up the membership roll for 1932-33; this likely was equal to or more than half the population of Pauline at the time.

Oct. 6, 1933 – “Discussion on bringing work of some kind to do at the meetings. No motion. Motion moved and second(sic) to have the following menu for election dinner. Potatoes, vegetables, salad, meat, pickles, pie, coffee, bread and butter & jelly”. Members could contribute “any kind of vegetable, salad or pies that would be convenient to bring.” It was agreed to meet in homes instead of the basement “to keep down fuel expense or anyone was welcome to use the basement but would have to furnish fuel and clean basement after the meeting”. The women closed their meeting with “Bringing in the Sheaves”.

May 18, 1933 – Mrs. Lizzie Evans read two Edgar A. Guest poems. Mrs. Harvey Jones gave two readings, one of which was “When man has done his effort”. Closing song was “What a Friend We Have in Jesus”.

May 3, 1934 – “Moved & seconded to finish quilt up into a baby quilt and start another quilt. Carried. Meeting closed by singing ‘In the Garden’.”

In May of 1938 the group served the Pauline High School junior-senior banquet, charging fifty cents per plate. The treasurer’s report showed that $6.50 was taken in. Charge of the event was given over to mothers of the classes. At the May 26 meeting it was agreed to write the students and their teachers “a note of thanks for giving the K.D.’s their banquet”.

Meeting matters occasionally traversed the more mundane, as on May 11, 1939 the group “moved & seconded that we have ice cream freezer handle welted(sic)”.

With the farm community immersed in summer field work, on June 8, 1939 it was “moved & seconded that we dispose of the church nites till after harvest.”

King’s Daughters Admission Service

Found in record book dating to 1939-40

Leader: Daughters of the King, do you in the presence of your Father, and in the name of His Son, and by the power of his Spirit and grace, dedicate yourself to service “In His Name.”
Answer: I do.
Leader: Will you look up, not down? Will you look out, not in? Will you look forward, not back? Will you lend a hand willingly, whenever the Father calls?
Answer: I will, whatsoever He saith unto me I will do it.
All join: Our help is “In the name” of the Lord. Grant to us Lord, we beseech Thee, the spirit to think and do, always such things as are right; that we who cannot do anything that is good without Thee, may by Thee be enabled to live according to Thy will, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
Song: Blest Be The Tide(sic) That Binds

This photograph was taken Sept. 27, 1940, when the King’s Daughters re-organized as the Women’s Society of Christian Service. Front row, from left, are Rev. Francis Harris, Mrs. John Anderson, Mrs. Arthur Sime, president; Mrs. Arthur Post, Mrs. Dan Schnuerle, Mrs. Earl Osgood, Mrs. John Leighfield, Mrs. William Overy, Mrs. Rube Heeren, Mrs. George Brown, Mrs. Maurice Baker, Mrs. Ivan Fate, Mrs. Owen Evans and Mrs. Tommy Jones. Second row, from left: Mrs. Roy Black, Mrs. Bernard Stroh, Mrs. Onno Valentine, Mrs. Frank Bourne. Third row, from left: Mrs. William Emel, Mrs. John Brown, Mrs. Ray Allen, Mrs. Aaron Jones, Mrs. Harvey Jones. Fourth row, from left: Mrs. Isaac Franklin, Mrs. Ernie Brown, Mrs. Lester Woods, Mrs. Walter Reiber, Mrs. Levi Sherman, treasurer; Mrs. Robert Jones. Fifth row, from left: Mrs. Ralph Teaford, Mrs. Carl Jones, Mrs. Ward Ziggafoos, Mrs. Tom Emel, Mrs. John Smidt, Mrs. Ben Zogg. Sixth row, from left: Mrs. Lester Simpson, Mrs. Klen Sherman, Mrs. Carl Whitcomb, secretary; Mrs. Howard Overy, Mrs. Erle Jones, Mrs. William Vonderfecht. Seventh row, from left: Mrs. William Moss, Mrs. Maude Brown, Miss Carolyn Smidt. Photo is courtesy of Marlyce Brown and Kathy Post Seeman.This photograph was taken Sept. 27, 1940, when the King’s Daughters re-organized as the Women’s Society of Christian Service. Front row, from left, are Rev. Francis Harris, Mrs. John Anderson, Mrs. Arthur Sime, president; Mrs. Arthur Post, Mrs. Dan Schnuerle, Mrs. Earl Osgood, Mrs. John Leighfield, Mrs. William Overy, Mrs. Rube Heeren, Mrs. George Brown, Mrs. Maurice Baker, Mrs. Ivan Fate, Mrs. Owen Evans and Mrs. Tommy Jones. Second row, from left: Mrs. Roy Black, Mrs. Bernard Stroh, Mrs. Onno Valentine, Mrs. Frank Bourne. Third row, from left: Mrs. William Emel, Mrs. John Brown, Mrs. Ray Allen, Mrs. Aaron Jones, Mrs. Harvey Jones. Fourth row, from left: Mrs. Isaac Franklin, Mrs. Ernie Brown, Mrs. Lester Woods, Mrs. Walter Reiber, Mrs. Levi Sherman, treasurer; Mrs. Robert Jones. Fifth row, from left: Mrs. Ralph Teaford, Mrs. Carl Jones, Mrs. Ward Ziggafoos, Mrs. Tom Emel, Mrs. John Smidt, Mrs. Ben Zogg. Sixth row, from left: Mrs. Lester Simpson, Mrs. Klen Sherman, Mrs. Carl Whitcomb, secretary; Mrs. Howard Overy, Mrs. Erle Jones, Mrs. William Vonderfecht. Seventh row, from left: Mrs. William Moss, Mrs. Maude Brown, Miss Carolyn Smidt. Photo is courtesy of Marlyce Brown and Kathy Post Seeman.

 

Highlights From The 1940s

Although fought on foreign soil, World War II was making an impact even on King’s Daughters, as reflected in the
 May 28, 1942 minutes: “The president made the announcement again about old postage stamps, urging all
members to save their stamps and bring them to next meeting. The dye in them is very useful to our allies.” This mixed with a bit of nostalgia, as “Our historian Mrs. O.G. Evans gave report of meetings 15-10-5 yrs. ago.” That same year the group also paid out $5.00 to the United Service Organization and $17.03 for flags.

A listing of money taken in during 1942 included lunches, $65.10; missions, $11.18; hens and donations, $32.82; lunch sold at sales, $67.33; lunch sold at wolf and rabbit hunt, $77.15; Hi-School banquet, $9.50; program & lunch, $9.28; Farm Journal drive, $14.60; 2nd group of Ways & Means, $6.55; sewing bees, $8.75; ice cream social, $14.28; community picnic, $6.20; hymnals $50.60; election dinner $37.09; miscellaneous (defense stamps, $.60; freezer, $.75; varnish, $1.00;) $2.35.

Money paid out in 1942 included: Minister’s salary, $135.00; light bills, $12.36; store bills, $56.54; missions, $13.50; coal bills, $35.14; state dues, $6.90; Salvation Army, $12.50; Dem. Printing Co. $4.25; U.S.O., $5.00; Flags, $17.03; Ayr Lumber Co. (church repair), $24.34; debt reduction campaign, $12.00; Mr. Albers (repairing church), $5.00; Methodist Publ. Co. (new hymnals), $50.25; Cash-Wa Lumber Co., $1.80; stove & coffee pot, $9.25; miscellaneous, $5.12. A total of $405.98 was paid out that year, leaving a balance on hand of $12.05.

The image at right is a newspaper clipping detailing the 49th anniversary celebration of the founding of the King's Daughters, which had been re-organized as the Women's Society of Christian Service. Thirty-eight local members were present for the event, as well as a number of past members. Notable former members included Mrs. Ella Spaulding, who'd joined the group in 1892 at it's second meeting. The clipping, likely from a Hastings newspaper, is provided courtesy of Mary VanBoening.

The above photo ran in the Hastings Daily Tribune on Saturday, April 8, 1972, with the following information: Taking part in a Thursday centennial observance of the first religious service held in 1870 at the Bill Kress homestead near Pauline were members of the Pauline United Methodist Women's Society of Christian Service. Pictured are, from left, seated: Mrs. Velva Overy, Mrs. Carol Bauder and Mrs. Mary Crosby; the children in front are Susan and Carol Smidt. From the left, first row, standing: Mrs. Audrey Whitcomb, Mrs. Elva Weyenberg, Mrs. Edna Reiber, Mrs. Dan Berger, Mrs. Gladys Ziggafoos, Mrs. Pat Smidt, Mrs. Helen Reiber, Mrs. Frances Evans, Mrs. Dorothy Brader and Mrs. Laurine Sherman. Back row, from left, are Mrs. Lizzie Post, the Rev. Martin Braun, Mrs. Lena Brown. Photo is courtesy of Donna Knight and The Hastings Daily Tribune.The above photo ran in the Hastings Daily Tribune on Saturday, April 8, 1972, with the following information: Taking part in a Thursday centennial observance of the first religious service held in 1870 at the Bill Kress homestead near Pauline were members of the Pauline United Methodist Women's Society of Christian Service. Pictured are, from left, seated: Mrs. Velva Overy, Mrs. Carol Bauder and Mrs. Mary Crosby; the children in front are Susan and Carol Smidt. From the left, first row, standing: Mrs. Audrey Whitcomb, Mrs. Elva Weyenberg, Mrs. Edna Reiber, Mrs. Dan Berger, Mrs. Gladys Ziggafoos, Mrs. Pat Smidt, Mrs. Helen Reiber, Mrs. Frances Evans, Mrs. Dorothy Brader and Mrs. Laurine Sherman. Back row, from left, are Mrs. Lizzie Post, the Rev. Martin Braun, Mrs. Lena Brown. Photo is courtesy of Donna Knight and The Hastings Daily Tribune.

Highlights From The 1980s

On July 5, 1984, the Pauline United Methodist Women met at the cabin at the site where the church was organized 100 years earlier, A church bulletin dating to 1984.A church bulletin dating to 1984.in 1884. Minutes read as follows: “7 present: Mary, Betty, Carol, Stephanie, Eileen, Dorothy, Mrs. Trucano. Meeting called to order by Eileen Muhle Sec & Treas
Reports read & approved.
Banners – tabled until Sept.
Upper Rooms must be decided Aug 1st.
Centennial – letters are out – July 22.
Ice cream social with cookies – Everyone bring cookies with picnic lunch.
South Central – fall meeting Sept. 18, Wood River.
Annual meeting Oct. 5 & 6, North Platte.
Aug. 1st – Velva – wait & see how Father is. Mrs. Trucano asked group to pray for Mrs. Henrietta Diers (illegible)
Paul Breithaupt & Myrtle Moore at Rushville.
Mary made motion to adjourn.”

*Courtesy of Pauline Methodist Church and Pat and Larry Smidt.

King’s Daughters In The News

"King’s Daughters met in the basement of the church last Thursday p.m. Mrs. Roy Black and Mrs. F.O. Bourne served a lovely lunch." – "Pauline,” The Hastings Democrat, Thursday, July 15, 1926

"The King’s Daughters have purchased a new gasoline stove for use in the basement of the church." –“Pauline,” The Hastings Democrat,This photograph dates from July 1966. Members are indicated with an asterisk (*). Front row, from left are *Mrs. Kluver, *Mrs. Teaford, *Sadie Smidt, *Edna Reiber, *Velva Overy, Lizzie Post. Back row, from left are *Ruth Stretesky, *Lizzie Evans, *Carol Bauder, *Arlynne Sherman, Frieda Kalvoda. Photo is courtesy of Marlyce Brown.This photograph dates from July 1966. Members are indicated with an asterisk (*). Front row, from left are *Mrs. Kluver, *Mrs. Teaford, *Sadie Smidt, *Edna Reiber, *Velva Overy, Lizzie Post. Back row, from left are *Ruth Stretesky, *Lizzie Evans, *Carol Bauder, *Arlynne Sherman, Frieda Kalvoda. Photo is courtesy of Marlyce Brown. Thursday, July 15, 1926

"King’s Daughters met at the home of Mrs. Gould Thursday afternoon. Mrs. Otto McDonald assisted with the lunch which was served to about forty-five."  – “Pauline,” The Hastings Democrat, Thursday, July 29, 1926

"King’s Daughters met at the farm home of Mrs. Wm. Reiber Thursday afternoon. Twenty-eight were present in spite of the bad roads."  –“Pauline,” The Hastings Democrat, Thursday, April 28, 1927

"The United Methodist Women met in the home of Mrs. Betty Snow on Wednesday. There were 7 members and 3 visitors present. Lunch was served and also a belated Christmas gift exchange was held." –“PAULINE and AYR NEWS,” by Lois Gates, Phone 771-2344, The Blue Hill Leader, Thursday, January 14, 1982.

The Pauline United Methodist Women will meet in the home of Mrs. Lloyd Muhle in Ayr on February 3 at 2 p.m. –“PAULINE and AYR NEWS,” by Lois Gates, Phone 771-2344, The Blue Hill Leader, Thursday, January 28, 1982.

 

WSCS Yearbook, 1955-56

Front cover of 1955-56 WSCS yearbook. Courtesy of Lois Gates Mohlman.Front cover of 1955-56 WSCS yearbook. Courtesy of Lois Gates Mohlman.

Statement of purpose and officers for WSCS in 1955-56.Statement of purpose and officers for WSCS in 1955-56.

Secretaries, division of work and standing committees of Pauline Methodists's WSCS, 1955-56.Secretaries, division of work and standing committees of Pauline Methodists's WSCS, 1955-56.

WSCS activities committees, first and second quarters.WSCS activities committees, first and second quarters.

Third- and fourth-quarter activities committees in 1955-56.Third- and fourth-quarter activities committees in 1955-56.

WSCS devotional and lesson leaders are shown for the year.WSCS devotional and lesson leaders are shown for the year.

This page offers a glimpse of of the group's activities for the 1955-56 year.This page offers a glimpse of of the group's activities for the 1955-56 year.

WSCS lesson and devotion leaders are shown for the 1955-56 year.WSCS lesson and devotion leaders are shown for the 1955-56 year.

The final page of the Pauline Methodist's WSCS yearbook issues a poignant call to service.The final page of the Pauline Methodist's WSCS yearbook issues a poignant call to service.